Home Work Retired

Home Work

A weekly advice podcast for people who work from home, whether freelancer or telecommuter. We address listener-submitted questions, comments and concerns about all aspects of working from home. Hosted by Dave Caolo. You can submit your questions here.

Hosted by Dave Caolo.

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203: Season 2: Episode 10 - Mike Drucker and Inbox Superstitions

April 4, 2016 at 6:00AM • 33 minutes • Wiki Entry

Dave and Aaron are joined by writer and comedian Mike Drucker, of the Tonight Show, and learn what it's like to have thousands of emails in your inbox.

This week's episode was sponsored by FreshBooks. To get FreshBooks free for 30 days, go to FreshBooks.com/homework and enter 'Home Work' in the “How did you hear about us?" section.

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Show Notes & Links Presented by CacheFly

203 Show Notes

This week the guys are joined by comedy writer Mike Drucker. Currently a staff writer for The Tonight Show, Mike's work has also appeared on The Onion, McSweeney's, Nintendo, IGN and more. Mike claims to be "superstitions" about email, which lead to an interesting discussion. Here are the episode's highlights.

5'05": Mike has been working from home since he started in comedy, around the age 19.

5'36": What is the work Mike does from home? A lot of freelancing for side projects. He's written for awards shows, punch-ups for video games and the like.

7'36": The importance of contributing to a team. "Support other people's ideas. If people see you as a supportive player, people want to keep you around and that'll keep you getting hired."

15'51": Mike discusses his email superstitions. "When I'm writing for the Tonight Show, there's a constant flux of emails coming in with requests...I have 58,540 unread emails on my iPhone right now." Also, if Mike can keep his inbox around 17,000 messages, he's good.

18'32": When notifications mean you don't have to read the full email message.

22'10": The "everything bucket." It absolutely can work. Using the search function can be a real boon if you can get the knack of coming up with the proper search terms.

App mentioned: Hazel